Day 2: A historical walking tour of Berlin

By Beth Cortez-Neavel

Our first day in Berlin was filled with the sights of history. We spent the day walking through the places we had read about and discussed in New York the previous two days. Despite our jetlag, FASPE’s European Director Thorsten Wagner led students and professors through the different city centers of Berlin, detailing the memorials and monuments of the city’s experiences during WWII.

Remnants of the Berlin Wall, which separated East and West Berlin from 1961 until 1989. FASPE13/Valerie Hopkins.

Remnants of the Berlin Wall, which separated East and West Berlin from 1961 until 1989. Photo by Valerie Hopkins.

FASPe European Director Thorsten Wagner gestures on a map to help orient the group shortly after landing in Berlin.

Thorsten Wagner gestures on a map to help orient the group shortly after landing in Berlin. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

Reflections of FASPE Law and Journalism students in the protective looking-glass as they discuss the empty white shelves below. The shelves are a reminder of the May 10, 1933 Nazi student book burnings that took place in the Bebelplatz public square in Berlin. Over 20,000 books by banned or radical authors were burned. FASPE13/Beth Cortez-Neavel.

Reflections of FASPE Law and Journalism students in the protective looking-glass as they discuss the empty white shelves below. The shelves are a reminder of the May 10, 1933 Nazi student book burnings that took place in the Bebelplatz public square in Berlin. More than 20,000 books by banned or radical authors were burned. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

FASPE Journalism student Byron Wilkes looks at section of the Berlin Wall at the Topography of Terror. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

FASPE Journalism student Byron Wilkes looks at section of the Berlin Wall at the Topography of Terror. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

FASPE’s journalism students stand next to the Stolpersteine (“stumbling blocks”) outside Humboldt Universität. The stolpersteine are cobblestone-sized memorials to victims of the Holocaust, designed by artist Gunter Demnig. Photo by Claire Ward.

FASPE’s journalism students stand next to the Stolpersteine (“stumbling blocks”) outside Humboldt Universität. The stolpersteine are cobblestone-sized memorials to victims of the Holocaust, designed by artist Gunter Demnig. Photo by Claire Ward.

The Neue, or "New" Synagogue originally allowed for 3,000 worshippers. It survived the brunt of WWII only to get bombed out by the Allied forces. It was rebuilt as a smaller version of itself.

The Neue, or “New” Synagogue originally allowed for 3,000 worshippers. It survived the brunt of WWII only to get bombed out by the Allied forces. It was rebuilt as a smaller version of itself. Photo by Valerie Hopkins.

A couple walks down the sidewalk of Rosenstrasse, home of the Rosenstrasse Protest, in which Gentile women demonstrated against the detainment of their Jewish husbands and relatives by German authorities in February 1943. Photo by Bogdon Mohora.

A couple walks down the sidewalk of Rosenstrasse, home of the Rosenstrasse Protest, in which Gentile women demonstrated against the detainment of their Jewish husbands and relatives by German authorities in February 1943. Photo by Bogdon Mohora.

A postcard written by Alice Licht to Otto Weidt from the Theresienstadt concentration camp on February 23, 1944 stands on display at the Museum of Otto Weidt’s Workshop for the Blind. The signature reads: Alice Licht née Worries—this may have been a coded message from Licht to Weidt indicating that she was in trouble. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

A postcard written by Alice Licht to Otto Weidt from the Theresienstadt concentration camp on Feb. 23, 1944, stands on display at the Museum of Otto Weidt’s Workshop for the Blind. The signature reads: Alice Licht née Worries—this may have been a coded message from Licht to Weidt indicating that she was in trouble. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

FASPE Law student Kristen Bell walks alongside the Monument to Sinti and Roma Murdered in the Holocaust. The German government did not recognize the mass murders of the heterogeneous population commonly called "gypsies" until 1982. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

FASPE Law student Kristen Bell walks alongside the Monument to Sinti and Roma Murdered in the Holocaust. The German government did not recognize the mass murders of the heterogeneous population commonly called “gypsies” until 1982. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

The controversial Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

The controversial Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe. Photo by Bogdan Mohora.

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, one block south of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. The controversial Memorial was designed by architect Peter Eisenman and inaugurated on May 10, 2005. Photo by Claire Ward.

The Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, one block south of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin. The controversial Memorial was designed by architect Peter Eisenman and inaugurated on May 10, 2005. Photo by Claire Ward.

Flowers left in front of the entrance to the underground museum at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

Flowers left in front of the entrance to the underground museum at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

FASPE Law student Eileen Dorfman listens to Holocaust survivor testimony at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

FASPE Law student Eileen Dorfman listens to Holocaust survivor testimony at the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe in Berlin. Photo by Beth Cortez-Neavel.

Comments are closed.